News

Dotmed.com’s AORN Video Profile: Ascent Healthcare Solutions

DOTmed.com’s AORN Video Profile: Ascent Healthcare Solutions (03/23/10):

As hospitals and health care providers look for ways to become more environmentally friendly, companies like Ascent Healthcare Solutions, that specialize in medical device reprocessing, thrive. Lars Thording, the senior director of marketing for Ascent Healthcare Solutions, spoke with DOTmed about reprocessing at the recent AORN conference. Thording explained how reprocessing can both save hospitals money (reprocessed devices is about half the cost of new ones) and have less negative effect on the environment. Additionally, Thording discusses a recent Johns Hopkins report that confirmed reprocessed devices is effective and safe.

Science Daily: Going Green in the Hospital: Recycling Medical Equipment Saves Money, Reduces Waste and Is Safe

Science Daily: Going Green in the Hospital: Recycling Medical Equipment Saves Money, Reduces Waste and Is Safe (02/26/10):

Wider adoption of the practice of recycling medical equipment — including laparoscopic ports and durable cutting tools typically tossed out after a single use — could save hospitals hundreds of millions of dollars annually and curb trash at medical centers, the second-largest waste producers in the United States after the food industry.

The Washington Post: President Obama Signs Landmark Health Bill Into Law

The Washington Post: President Obama signs landmark health bill into law (03/23/10): 

President Obama signed a landmark health-care bill into law Tuesday, enacting a sweeping overhaul of the nation’s $2.5 trillion health system….

Executive Healthcare: Recycling could save medical centers money

Executive Healthcare: Recycling could save medical centers money (03/16/10):

In America, medical centers are the second-largest waste producers after the food industry. If medical centers recycled their medical equipment, annually, they could save hundreds of millions of dollars, according to an analysis by John Hopkins.

DOTmed.com: Health Care Vote May Come This Weekend

DOTmed.com reports: Health Care Vote May Come This Weekend March 18, 2010 (03/18/10).  

It’s wait and hurry up. House of Representatives action on the long-awaited health reform legislation may come as soon as this weekend, according to House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Maryland).

The Yuma Sun: Look for Health Savings

In an op-ed in the Yuma Sun entitled Look for Health Savings (03/13/10) author Fred Earl writes:

 …Reprocessing medical devices is another waste-reduction frontier. Scalpels, knives, blades, hooks, probes, catheters and more – including some labeled by manufacturers for single use – can last longer. Hospitals can enliven devices in-house or outsource this work. On average, this saves 50 percent compared with purchasing a new item, the Association of Medical Device Reprocessors says….

DotMed.com, Michigan Legislature Sends Device Re-Use Bill to Governor

DotMed.com reports that the Michigan Legislature Sends Device Re-Use Bill to Governor, (03/16/10). AMDR-supported legislation to prohibit certain re-use of “single-use” items has passed the Michigan legislature.  DotMed.com reports that Senate Bill No. 528 was passed 37-0 and the bill is now being prepared for presentation to Governor Jennifer Granholm. 

 The bill states that a health care provider shall not knowingly reuse, recycle, refurbish for reuse or provide for reuse a single-use device. Exceptions are provided for health care providers that use a single-use device that has been reprocessed by an entity registered as a reprocessor and regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or uses an open but unused single-use device that has been resterilized. Violations of the law, if enacted, would incur up to 10 years imprisonment and a fine up to $50,000.

TriplePundit.com: Many Hospitals Now Safely Reuse ‘Single Use’ Medical Devices

TriplePundit.com reports Many Hospitals Now Safely Reuse ‘Single Use’ Medical Devices (03/12/10).  In addition to discussing some of the facts behind the “single-use” label, TriplePundit discusses the recent Academic Medicine Journal article supportive of reprocessing for its environmental benefits:

Indeed, the FDA now allows the reprocessing of more than 100 different items previously designated as “single-use devices” (SUDs). And, in an opinion piece in this month’s Academic Medicine, researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine say they have found reprocessing to be a “commonsense strategy” that has a “reliable safety record of excellence identical to that of new equipment, while being friendlier to the environment.”

Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry: An Era of Change: New ­Director, New ­Direction for FDA?

In the February 2010 issue of Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry, the Editor’s write An Era of Change: New ­Director, New ­Direction for FDA?

Since his [CDRH Director Jeffrey Shuren, MD] appointment to acting director, Shuren has begun a comprehensive review of many programs and processes and set in motion a strategic planning process. He also prioritized the support of innovation in medical devices, the modernizing of device safety efforts, and the strengthening of important internal procedures.

Going Green in the Hospital: Johns Hopkins Researchers Say Recycling Medical Equipment Saves Money, Reduces Waste and Is Safe

Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations: Going Green in the Hospital: Johns Hopkins Researchers Say Recycling Medical Equipment Saves Money, Reduces Waste and Is Safe (02/24/10):

Wider adoption of the practice of recycling medical equipment – including laparoscopic ports and durable cutting tools typically tossed out after a single use – could save hospitals hundreds of millions of dollars annually and curb trash at medical centers, the second-largest waste producers in the United States after the food industry.

The recommendation, made in an analysis by Johns Hopkins researchers in the March issue of the journal Academic Medicine, noted that with proper sterilization, recalibration and testing, reuse of equipment is safe.