Profitable Expansion and Growth Predicted for MDR Industry in Coming Years

Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Profitable Expansion and Growth Predicted for MDR Industry in Coming Years

September 4th, 2015

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Reprocessed Medical Devices Market Analysis, Market Size, Application Analysis, Regional Outlook, Competitive Strategies and Forecasts, 2015 to 2022

by Brad Micklin

[The] worldwide reprocessed medical devices market is predicted to observe a profitable expansion and growth over the projected period as a result of factors like rising significance of medical waste minimization in order to annihilate/curb ecological problems. Rising cost savings and enhanced sustainability of equipments like respiratory device, diaphragm fitting rings, esophageal manometry probes and gastrointestinal endoscopes are also predicted to drive the market demand over the forecasted time span. Modernization in device testing procedures, device inspection methods, device cleansing methods and device sterilization procedures makes the devices reusable. These reprocessed medical equipments/instruments are then considered safe for scientific applications and become high impact rendering drivers for the reprocessed medical devices market.

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Still #1 Focus: European Discussions on MDR and IVDR Regulations

September 4th, 2015

MEDTECH EUROPE

With the political summer break over, discussions on the proposed Medical Device Regulation (MDR) and In Vitro Diagnostic Regulation (IVDR) are scheduled to pick up again with trilogue discussions between the Commission, Parliament and Council expected to begin in the middle of October. There are also additional Council working party meetings scheduled for 8, 9, 15 and 22 September (click here for more info). MedTech Europe members EDMA and Eucomed will continue to actively engage with policy makers as these critical dossiers enter into the next phase of the negotiation.

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For an Environmentally Friendly Supply Chain, What We Buy Matters

September 2nd, 2015

 

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Commentary: For an environmentally friendly supply chain, what we buy matters

By Jeffrey Brown

Most hospitals know that the selection of products they buy can have a tremendous impact on their sustainability performance. Creating a more sustainable hospital starts in large part with changing the products and supplies that come through the front door and leave as waste through the back door.

Another example of smart EPP practices took place at Virginia Mason Hospital and Medical Center in Seattle where they reduced supply cost by $3 million in three years by reprocessing single-use devices rather than disposing of them. Product designs and purchase contract terms that promote reprocessing are, again, the result of supply chain collaboration.

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Practice Greenhealth & Sustainable Procurement

August 28th, 2015

 

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Source: Sustainable City Network

Practice Greenhealth is a nonprofit and member of the SPLC.  It provides resources and tools to guide its 1,300 members in the U.S. and Canada on standards for environmentally preferable purchasing.

“Sustainable health care that’s good for the environment, good for patients and staff, and good for the bottom line means action plans to eliminate mercury, reduce and recycle solid waste, reduce regulated and chemical waste, reduce energy and water consumption, create healing environments, and establish green purchasing policies,” its website states.

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AMDR Comments from the European Commission’s Public Consultation on the Circular Economy

August 27th, 2015

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Comments from the Association of Medical Device Reprocessors
European Commission’s Public Consultation on the Circular Economy
August 20, 2015
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The Association of Medical Device Reprocessors (AMDR) applauds the Commission’s Circular Economy initiative and urges consideration of the effects of healthcare waste. The reprocessing of a select number of medical devices labeled by the original manufacturer as for “single‐use” safety extends the life and value of expensive medical instrumentation, reduces demands on natural resources, eliminates medical waste and repurposes valuable materials such as gold, platinum, steel and plastics. The nascent commercial medical device reprocessing industry, if properly promoted, has the potential to save EU hospitals hundreds of millions of Euros a year, reduce hazardous medical waste, increase recycling, and drive job growth in the reprocessing industry… 

Full Comments Available Here via PDF:

AMDR Comments to EC Consultation on Circular Economy 20 August 2015

EU Council Adopts Position on Revised Medical Devices Package

August 26th, 2015

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Single-Use Devices and Reprocessing of Devices

According to the draft regulation on medical devices as amended by the [Council of the European Union], reprocessing and further use of single-use devices may take place only when permitted by member states. The commission is also required to establish and regularly update a list of categories or groups of single-use devices which cannot be reprocessed safely and may therefore not be reprocessed.

The council’s view concerning the reprocessing of medical devices differs from that of Parliament. Parliament proposed that medical devices be considered suitable for reprocessing and as reusable devices by default, unless they are placed on a list of single-use devices which are unsuitable for reprocessing.

As with Parliament’s proposal, the council also considered that any natural or legal person wishing to reprocess a single-use device in order to make it suitable for further use must be considered as the manufacturer of the reprocessed device and be held liable for the reprocessing. However, the council introduced an exception to this principle for single-use devices which are reprocessed and used in a health institution.

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Green Purchasing is Smart Purchasing

August 26th, 2015

HPN

 

 

Green Purchasing is Smart Purchasing

Virginia Mason Medical Center is a prime example of a healthcare center which has saved millions of dollars through smarter purchasing decisions. This Seattle-based hospital saved $3 million in supply costs over three years after instituting a reprocessing program for single-use devices.

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Virginia Mason’s Reprocessing Initiative

Virginia Mason Medical Center is a participant in Practice Greenhealth’s Healthier Hospitals program.

Stryker Sustainability approached Virginia Mason with the idea of utilizing reprocessed medical devices. Reprocessed medical devices are FDA-cleared (and pre-audited for quality), demonstrate the same high level of quality, [and] have a lower total cost and a reduced environmental impact than many single-use devices.  Physicians joined the leadership team to evaluate the devices, including visiting the reprocessing plant and consulting with other surgeons. The group decided to start with a few devices and expanded as time went on. After learning how each device is inspected for quality and held to the highest standard, the team moved forward.

As a result, Virginia Mason [has] reduced purchasing costs by more than $3 million since 2012, reduc[ing] annual waste disposal costs as well as toxins released into the environment.

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Reprocessing Initiative at Broward Health Promotes Environmental Stewardship and Cost Savings

August 25th, 2015

 

 

 

Greening the Cleaning Process

Source: Healthcare Purchasing News

HPN’s Susan Cantrell discusses Broward Health’s achievements in healthcare sustainability.

An award-winning example of a healthcare facility with sustainability as its mission is Broward Health, Ft. Lauderdale, FL.

At Broward Health, it was recognized that good environmental stewardship does not end with them. They saw the need to extend their environmentally preferred and sustainable procurement practices to their vendors and business partners. “Broward Health requires vendors responding to all formal bids to provide information on their company’s green policy and, when feasible, will support these companies’ products and services, as long as existing sourcing practices and patient care is not compromised,” explained [Brian] Bravo [CMRP, Corporate Procurement Officer and Director of Materials Management].

Their efforts have been rewarded… “From 2012 through 2014, Broward Health has been able to divert 6,322,690 pounds of waste from landfills and saved $3,366,113 within its top three green Initiatives: reprocessing of single-use devices (SUDs), operating room (OR) waste reduction, and integrated waste-stream solution (IWSS) programs.”

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Preventing Unsustainable Sustainability

August 25th, 2015

HPN

 

 

Preventing Unsustainable Sustainability

Source: Healthcare Purchasing News

What are some common mistakes made, along with some suggestions on making good?  Sustainability experts share their thoughts.

The most common mistake that supply chain leaders make when implementing a [single-use device] reprocessing program is focusing on purchase price instead of the volume of reprocessed product as the key factor in delivering savings. This includes contract bundling agreements where the original device manufacturer designs the agreement to limit a hospital’s ability to reprocess. Some SUD reprocessing contracts bundle reprocessed devices with original devices or capital equipment. These contracts might require the purchase of one new device for every two reprocessed, and if a minimum purchase volume is met, the health system may receive a discount on the new devices. These terms and conditions might look attractive on paper, but these contracts can fall short of meeting expectations. Maximum savings are achieved by minimizing the number of new devices purchased. To avoid contracting pitfalls, select a vendor that doesn’t tie reprocessing savings to minimum purchase requirements for new devices.

Another common mistake is believing program education is only necessary at the program’s inception. Long-term success of reprocessing is dependent upon constant education, measurement and promotion of results.

– Bill Scott, Senior Director of Marketing, Stryker Sustainability Solutions

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Reprocessing’s Role in the Responsible Supply Chain

August 24th, 2015

 

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Pursuing the ‘Responsible’ Supply Chain

Source: Healthcare Purchasing News

Author: Rick Dana Barlow

Highlights

Healthcare organizations increasingly have grown to recognize the financial, operational and social features, costs and benefits of sustainability as a business strategy as well as a patient service. It’s a “green” issue that can lead to “in-the-black” outcomes.

[One such] trend is expansion of reprocessed devices, instruments and supplies — these resources are heavily regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, divert waste from landfills, and typically help organizations to lower their supply costs which, in turn, may help control the cost of health care. 

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