Symposium: Greening the OR

Outpatient Surgery: Reprocessed vs. New Single-Use Devices Blog

Outpatient Surgery: Reprocessed vs. New Single-Use Devices Blog entries:

I am also an RN (and a human) and I wouldn’t require that new stainless steel instruments be used on me or my loved ones since it’s clear no one could afford healthcare if we did that.

It’s also clear that without looking for ways to reduce costs then fewer patients (am me or my loved ones) won’t receive adequate healthcare. I’m also concerned about the environment and the impact medical waste has on it.

The real question is: “Are reprocessed medical devices safe and effective?” The FDA thinks so which is why they regulate and approve certain devices for reprocessing. If you’re concerned that the FDA is wrong, then we should be concerned that new devices shouldn’t be used on our loved ones since the FDA approves them for use as well.

We’ve been reprocessing for many years and have never had a problem. We saved hundreds of thousands of dollars and dramatically reduced our medical waste.

I’m glad to be part of making healthcare more affordable (without impacting safety or clinical outcomes) and saving the planet for future generations.

CHIMES (Calvin College Newspaper): Reprocessing Your Health

CHIMES (Calvin College Newspaper): Reprocessing Your Health (03/19/10):

Gone are the days when hospital staff thoughtlessly tossed used medical equipment into the nearest landfill.

According to a study released this month in the journal “Academic Medicine”, U.S. health care facilities generate 4 billion pounds of waste every year. Only the food industry produces more.

The study, published by a Yale medical student and two faculty members at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, states that escalating environmental concerns, combined with a need to pinch pennies, are driving hospitals to reconsider what they pitch and what they recycle.

Ecoglove.com: Responsible Device Strategies Saved Hospitals Millions of Dollars in 2009

Ecoglove.com, Responsible Device Strategies Saved Hospitals Millions of Dollars in 2009 (reprinted release):

 Ascent, the market leader in the remanufacturing of medical devices in the U.S., announced today that its hospital partners realized hundreds of millions of dollars in cost savings through the use of medical device remanufacturing programs in 2009. On a per-hospital basis, some hospitals saved more than $600,000 per year. Ascent’s programs also helped customers reduce their environmental footprint by diverting an estimated 5.3 million pounds of total waste from landfills.

Ecoglove.com, Medical Device Reprocessors Say Health Reform May Provide a Boost

Ecoglove.com, Medical Device Reprocessors Say Health Reform May Provide a Boost (03/26/10):

As medical device manufacturers seek to fend off the implementation of a new tax contained in the national health reform law enacted Tuesday, advocates for the recycling of such devices say the new tax could give the reprocessing industry a lift.

“More and more hospitals are moving into single-use device reprocessing,” said Bill Ravanesi, Boston regional director of Health Care Without Harm, crediting the increasing emphasis on reducing costs. The 2.3 percent tax on device makers, scheduled to take effect Jan. 1, 2013, “is going to push more hospitals into reprocessing,” he said.

Ecoglove.com, Re-Using Equipment Could Help Hopsitals Go Green

Ecoglove.com, Re-Using Equipment Could Help Hopsitals Go Green (03/02/10):

 U.S. health care facilities generate over four billion pounds of waste each year, second only to the food industry in trash-making.

But much of this waste could be avoided, according to a new study, by cleaning, testing and re-sterilizing many types of medical equipment after first use, including elastic bandages, finger oxygen sensors and tourniquet cuffs.